The Friday Five, Blogs That Matter – September 6, 2013

Five Blogs of Note for the Week Ending September 6, 2013

5 blogs that matter

Continuing in my new tradition, here are quotes from 5 blogs that got my attention this week.

I don’t benefit from reposting any of these posts. Sometimes, I don’t even know the writer. However, I do read and personally grow my knowledge by reading posts that challenge my thinking and get me to think outside my old paradigm.

It’s not important that you agree with any of these writers. It’s only important that you think.

I hope you will find some new sources of inspiration with these posts.

Here’s the next group of 5 in the series:

 

George Anders

How Great Leaders Communicate

George AndersYou’ve just been promoted into one of your organization’s Big Jobs. Now you’ve got an impressive office, a hefty budget and vast expectations about how you will lead dozens or even thousands of people. Can you stick with the leadership style that brought you this far? Or do you need to recalibrate your approach, starting with the way you communicate?

Some fascinating rethinking is under way on exactly that topic. Scholars such as Harvard Business School’s Boris Groysberg argue that effective leadership no longer revolves around brilliant speeches and heroic exhortations. (We can call that the Fidel Castro approach – and it doesn’t work especially well in either government or mainstream business.)

Read the post…

 

Penelope Trunk

5 Things You Have to Unlearn to Succeed at Work

Penepole TrunkA big theme in my life has been how much I had to unlearn to come to the decision to homeschool my kids.

I had to unlearn all my assumptions about parenting (it turns out that kids don’t need teachers, they need love). I unlearned my assumptions about self‑management (well-roundedness is an outdated goal). And I had to change my assumptions about how much respect each child deserves (freedom to choose what we learn is a fundamental right).

Now that I’ve been homeschooling for a while, I understand that the reason it’s traumatic for most young adults to enter the workforce is because they have to unlearn so many things from school in order to survive in adult life.

No matter what age you are, the faster you start your unlearning the faster you can shed the weights that hold you back from moving forward in today’s knowledge-based workforce. Here are five things most people need to unlearn.

1. Accommodating forced learning

Gen Y’s latest thing is binge learning, where you become so interested in what you’re doing that you don’t want to stop until you’ve learned it all.

Read the post…

 

Carey Jones

Ask the Critic: Here’s How Tipping Actually Works

Carey JonesUnless you’re in the habit of tipping with a handshake, sliding a $20-or-whatever directly into your server’s hand, here’s the reality: your tip does not go directly to your waiter.

Read that last bit again, it’s important. Probably the biggest misconception of the dining public.

Many restaurants allot payout via a points system, in which tips are pooled, then distributed at the end of the night. Think that the extra amount you’re penciling in goes into the pocket of helpful waitress Lauren or bartender Steve? Well, not quite.

Read the post…

 

Mike Henry

3 Warning Signs for Responsible Leaders

Mike HenryI’ve come to notice some warning signs in my speech. These are words that help me identify when I’m not being a character-based leader. Whenever I use these words, I’m avoiding a character attribute that is valuable to me. For each one, I try to let them trigger me to change my thoughts and my behavior.

The 3 Warning Signs are “but”, “they”, and “need”.

But

“But” is the excuse word. It always provides an alternative. But when everything before the “but” is related to a personal responsibility, commitment or promise, we’re always our best when we simply stop the sentence and keep the “but” to ourselves.

Read the post…

 

Dave Lerner

The Supremacy of Warm Market Introductions

Dave LernerIn the tech world, we hear the term “warm introductions” bandied about ad nauseum, often from the horse’s mouth—namely, that it’s the best and sometimes the only way for entrepreneurs to meet angel investors and venture capitalists. A so-called warm introduction occurs when person A introduces person B to person C with an express endorsement of person B. Person A is basically telling person C that they are vouching for the character and worthiness of person B.

That’s the explicit message, of course. The implicit message is quite powerful as well and can best be expressed by what types of behavior just won’t suffice when it comes to introducing yourself. The short list includes some or all of the following admonitions:

  • Don’t wait in a long line to talk to an investor after she speaks on a panel.
  • Don’t cold email an investor with a long email and business plan.

Read the post…

 

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist

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