Hugh Ballou banner image 0
Hugh Ballou banner image 0 Hugh Ballou banner image 1

I believe in equality for everyone, except reporters and photographers.

― Mahatma Gandhi

DiversityWe hear lots of noise in conversations and in the media about striving for equality of gender, nationality, and race – equal opportunity – equal rights – equal pay, etc.

Recently in Blacksburg, Virginia, in a session called “Dialogue on Race,” a young African-American presenter used the phrase “Diversity of Excellence” in his presentation. That phrase made so much sense to me. I have adopted the idea and reversed the words to get “Excellence of Diversity.”

The media make up sound bites and promote phrases to get attention and ultimately to get ratings and make money. We all get sucked into this diatribe of mediocrity. We are driven to the bottom…the lowest common denominator…the drivel of sameness.

I say to women leaders, “Why do you want to be equal with men when, in fact, you are better? You offer a different paradigm for leadership and a fresh perspective. You have a skill set that is different. Why not claim your excellence and move to the top rather than attempting to be equal?” Most agree and react as if they feel empowered.

I repeat this question to minority groups and get the same response.

In a society where we have dumbed down our educational system with standardized testing and set the bar to the lowest point in striving for equality, we are teaching each other that mediocrity is the norm. In an address to educators, I heard Alfie Kohn* describe standardized testing as an “Ethnic cleansing of the society.” In Marva Dawn’s book, Reaching Out Without Dumbing Down, the first chapter is the history of how education has been dumbed down over the years. She then describes how churches have dumbed down to attract new members when, in fact, the mainline denominations are now losing members at an alarming rate. We have clergy working as consultants, teaching pastors what to do as a simple formula for success, rather than reaching out of the broken paradigm and getting wisdom from a different source.

We have no clearly written guiding principles for personal empowerment in leadership for our organizations.

My guiding principle is to strive for excellence through diversity and let the best people do the best work.

Do we get stuck because we are threatened by the excellence of someone who doesn’t look like us?

What’s your opinion?

* The Case Against Standardized Testing: Raising the Scores, Ruining the Schools, Alfie Kohn

 

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

Subscribe to The Transformational Leadership Strategist by Email

(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

 

Resources

Let’s Chat About Leadership…

This blog series appears on Tuesdays, and focuses on resources that I use as I pace my ability to continually strive for my greatest effectiveness. Leaders get things done. In order to accomplish this objective, it’s important to have the necessary skills and systems in place. I have tried many things over many years and have settled on what’s simple, reliable, and consistent.

Each resource will appear under one or more of my four leadership principles:
  1. Foundations: Clarity of purpose and outcomes, and equipping oneself for excellence;
  2. Relationships: Building and maintaining healthy and effective relationships;
  3. Systems: Tools and processes for leading and empowering transformation; and
  4. Balance: Managing multiple priorities and managing self.

Each resource I blog about is one I have tested and used personally. I do not make money on these referrals unless specifically stated in the post.

Today’s resource:

Exercise

Running solo

© Martinmark | Dreamstime.com – Running Photo

According to the Mayo Clinic, exercise is good for us in the following ways: Exercise controls weight, combats health conditions and diseases, improves health, puts the spark back into your sex life, can be fun.

I know these benefits are true. I also know that exercise allows me to be a better leader in the following ways:

  1. Exercise helps dissipate the effects of stress: Leadership is stressful. That’s an unavoidable fact, so we must deal with it. Running is my exercise of choice. My body temperature rises, I eliminate toxins from my system chemically and emotionally, and I can relax after a 2-3 mile run. This allows me to refocus and approach whatever is causing my stress from a fresh perspective.
  2. Exercise is time for prayer and meditation: I do not carry a device that puts sound into my ears. I appreciate the sounds around me and the smells and temperature nuances. I clear my mind of any programming or pre-set thoughts. I allow God’s healing presence to fill my mind and spirit. It’s a personal alone time with my creator. I am in a state of gratitude and open for receiving inspired thoughts.
  3. Exercise is brain stimulation: I allow time for prayer and meditation, and then allow time for thinking. Thinking is relevant to my day ahead. I’m able to think clearer because more blood is circulating through my brain. I can simply think about a problem and my brain begins to create solutions. It’s really quite amazing. I must sometimes stop running and dictate into my iPhone what thoughts come into my mind. There are so many of them and they come so fast, I can’t retain them all unless I find a way to record them.

A few years ago, I created a series of posts on running and leadership. Here are the links:

What benefits do you receive from exercise?

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

Subscribe to The Transformational Leadership Strategist by Email

(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

Hugh Ballou on March 23rd, 2015
John Maxwell defines the “Law of the Lid” what I define as a leadership ceiling. Our organization cannot grow beyond our ability to lead it. The skill to learn is how to raise the ceiling.
CeilingI have never been without ideas. I have so many good ideas that others get dizzy just hearing about them. I can’t possibly complete all my objectives if I can’t set priorities and define what’s practical. I can do anything I put my mind to achieving. I can’t do everything that I conceive, however. Therefore, I must set some boundaries. In fact, I need to raise the bar constantly on my personal abilities. I continue to hit my own ceiling of ability, therefore, I am constantly working on my own skill set.
Here are my 3 principles for self-awareness and personal growth:
  1. Don’t ignore the signs – I met with a friend today who spoke of a multi-year project that cost him all of his wealth because he ignored the signs that it wasn’t going to work. Having faith in your vision is not the same as ignoring signs that it’s not working. Pay attention to what the market is saying to you when they don’t buy. Correct or stop before wasting too many resources on the failure.
  2. Have a trusted advisor – I constantly have people around me who challenge my thinking and help me revise and vet my ideas. I also have someone I pay as a trusted advisor. That person provides consistent feedback and council, and helps me reveal my blind spots. As coach, strategist, and trusted advisor, I can’t do those things for myself that I can do for others. This is too important to leave to volunteers. It’s a priority to pay for this helpful perspective.
  3. Define objective measurement standards – define ways to measure success that are basically black or white. The evidence is clear and not skewed by emotion or passion. Measure and evaluate. Using a balance scorecard is useful here.
Everyone is good at something and no one is good at everything, or at least not their best at everything. Define your gaps and delegate. Work on top skills. Surround yourself with smart people who provide accurate information and speak the truth in love. Ditch the ego.

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

Subscribe to The Transformational Leadership Strategist by Email

(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

Hugh Ballou on March 20th, 2015

Blogs of Note for the Week Ending March 20, 2015

5 blogs that matterEvery day I learn something that advances my leadership knowledge and competency. Here are quotes from 5 blogs that got my attention this week. I don’t benefit from reposting any of these posts. Sometimes, I don’t even know the writer. However, I do read and personally grow my knowledge by reading posts that challenge my thinking and get me to think outside my old paradigm. It’s not important that you agree with any of these writers. It’s only important that you think. I hope you will find some new sources of inspiration with these posts. Here’s the next group of 5 in the series:

 

J.D. Harrison

No, entrepreneurs, most of you don’t need angel investors or venture capitalists

J D HarrisonAUSTIN, Texas–It’s understandable, perhaps even inevitable, to walk away from events like South by Southwest with the impression that entrepreneurs must persuade investors to write them a big fat check in order to succeed in today’s start-up world. In many cases, it’s as much about validation as it is the money and with some of the most renowned investors strolling the streets of Austin in search of hot new companies, you could be forgiven for assuming something must be wrong when a new company mentions it’s – gasp – self-funded.

Only, that simply isn’t true. Not by a long shot.

During an event in Austin on Monday, the Kauffman Foundation outlined research dispelling some of the most common myths that distort America’s idea of the business-building process, tops among them the notion that most successful start-ups raise money from outside investors.

Read the post…

 

Neil Patel

11 Things Every Entrepreneur Must Outsource to Survive

Neil PatelYou can’t do everything. You shouldn’t do everything. And if you try to do everything, you will die.

This is wisdom. I wish I could label it as some Chinese proverb, handed down by generations of wise sages. In reality, this is a lesson I learned in the crucible of entrepreneurship.

As an entrepreneur, you don’t have any extra time.

Every minute is crammed to capacity. Every day is scheduled to the hilt. Every moment has something–usually a lot of somethings–screaming for your attention.

How do you overcome this incredible challenge?

The solution is easy. Really easy. Simply do less.

How can you afford to do less? Outsource more

Read the post…

 

 

Thomas Oppong

Do You Have What It Takes To Successfully Run A Small Business?

Thomas OppongRegardless of whether the idea of running a business appeals to you, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you have what it takes to do it.

To make a success out of your business, you will need to put in lots of time and effort, as well as money from your own pocket. And even after all that, it can still take years to get your business up and running properly. That is why before starting your own business, you need to make sure that you have what it takes to be successful.

To learn more about what it takes to make a success out of a new business, keep reading below.

Are you a good multi-tasker?

Read the post …

 

 

Sue Grafton

An Idea’s Execution, Not Its Uniqueness, Yields Success

Sue GraftonI hate to rain on your parade, but your idea is not special. There are likely other entrepreneurs or companies with “your” idea, equally inspired to dominate the business world and to make millions.

And when your idea becomes a solid business generating lots of revenue, you can be sure that someone is just waiting to capitalize on your idea, too. In Silicon Valley, copycat companies are called “me-too” companies. You know them. For instance, once Groupon became popular, all sorts of me-too companies sprang up. According to a recent MSNBC.com report, over six hundred companies have the same business model as Groupon or a variation on it.

Despite the fact that your idea is not unique and thus for the taking, you can still boost your probability of success over your competitors. How? Focus on the execution of your idea and make it work better than anyone else on the planet.

Read the post…

 

Neal Schaffer

How to Write Your First Blog Post on the LinkedIn Publishing Platform

Neal SchafferAre you ready to take your first baby steps in publishing your voice on LinkedIn?

I’ve already blogged here on LinkedIn about how to use the LinkedIn publishing platform for various professional objectives as well as tips on how to write posts on LinkedIn that will get read. Now it’s time to roll up our collective sleeves and learn the mechanics of the platform itself.

First of all, not all of you have access to the LinkedIn publishing platform yet, and LinkedIn acknowledges that it will take awhile before everyone has access. I might have gotten access before or after you, but you will gain access sooner or later.

Read the post…

 

 

 

 

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

Subscribe to The Transformational Leadership Strategist by Email

(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

“The key to successful leadership is influence, not authority.” ~ Kenneth H. Blanchard

Boss Mug

The notion of being a boss as an effective leader is far gone. Once when I had a team, they gave me an official “BOSS” card. I was a card-carrying boss. The card pointed out that boss spelled backwards is “Double S O B.” Funny!

But it’s not funny. Pressuring team members and dictating what to do is not effective in today’s work environment.

Here are some polarities:

Boss Vs Influencer

Got the idea?

The leader is first and foremost a person of influence.

 

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

Subscribe to The Transformational Leadership Strategist by Email

(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

Resources

Let’s Chat About Leadership…

This blog series appears on Tuesdays, and focuses on resources that I use as I pace my ability to continually strive for my greatest effectiveness. Leaders get things done. In order to accomplish this objective, it’s important to have the necessary skills and systems in place. I have tried many things over many years and have settled on what’s simple, reliable, and consistent.

Each resource will appear under one or more of my four leadership principles:
  1. Foundations: Clarity of purpose and outcomes, and equipping oneself for excellence;
  2. Relationships: Building and maintaining healthy and effective relationships;
  3. Systems: Tools and processes for leading and empowering transformation; and
  4. Balance: Managing multiple priorities and managing self.

Each resource I blog about is one I have tested and used personally. I do not make money on these referrals unless specifically stated in the post.

Today’s resource:

CEO Space

CEO Space International

Over the past eight years I have been on a transformational journey of repositioning, refining, and growth in my business, my skills, and my brand. I discovered CEO Space in 2005 and thought it was a fluke. After thinking about it for the year, I finally met the founder, Berny Dohrmann. I was impressed with his insights into my business model and encouraged by his vision for upgrading my work. I registered and attended my first event in December 2006.

By May of 2007, I was invited to become an instructor and the momentum of my journey increased. Since I had spent 40 years as musical conductor facing the orchestra and chorus with my back to the audience, I had to learn a new skill – presenting to the audience. This organization has given me a platform to share my knowledge, to build my skills, and to increase my network. I have learned and employed the power of cooperative capitalism with my work and been encouraged by clients to learn and utilize the paradigm shift as well.

This is a resource that has allowed me to up my game and to influence others to join the worldwide movement.

It’s not an ordinary networking event. It’s not only an educational event. It’s the synergy of like-minded leaders bringing energy to each other. It’s a place of almost limitless resources of contacts and support.

On March 22, 2015, I will begin participating in my 45th CEO Space event in a row. I attend and teach and coach because I grow personally and I improve my business each time.

The top-level leaders and experts I work with are people I have met at this highly effective business growth conference. Many of them have become my dearest friends and colleagues.

I recommend that you check it out at http://ceospaceinternational.com

 

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

Subscribe to The Transformational Leadership Strategist by Email

(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

Hugh Ballou on March 16th, 2015

Teamwork makes the dream work, but a vision becomes a nightmare when the leader has a big dream and a bad team.

- John C. Maxwell

TeamHaving the dream team is every leader’s dream, however few know how to build that team. We tend to gravitate to people we like, regardless of their fit for the culture we have or we are creating. Selection of team members is an art and a skill.

When I studied with the composer, conductor René Clausen shared the process he used to select the right singer for the Concordia Choir. This highly skilled ensemble has matched voices who understand how to participate in maintaining ensemble and how to become part of the skillfully blended sound. The audition process included all the demonstration of skills – matching pitch, sight reading, staying in tune when singing a cappella, and vocal tone quality. In addition, René classified their voice type as “fluty” or “reedy” with an intensity measure of 1-6. Finally, he placed the final candidates in a circle by that nomenclature. He could only replace graduating singers with the same voice type, so he had to select from the voice-type group only the number of singers to fill the open slots.

This is a lot of work; however, this recruiting process ensures that the quality of the ensemble remains constant. If leaders used a similar kind of process to measure competency, agility, values, personality, and ability to follow principles and apply lessons learned, then there would be a consistency in team synergy and functionality.

We typically don’t know how to do this.

Here’s a process I teach leaders who are hiring new team members:

  1. Have an updated strategy – Be sure that the strategic plan is up to date and that the competencies listed are still the competencies needed. In addition, review roles and responsibilities to be sure that you are hiring for the right profile. It’s tempting to just replace the former person with another one for the same job description without reviewing the position to see if it’s still accurate.
  2. Define the qualifications needed – Hire for competencies and hire for personality. I didn’t say hire people that you like. There’s a danger in hiring people just because you like them. Hire people who fit the culture you are creating or the culture you have. This is crucial. One hire who is not a team player will change the makeup of the team. First, define competencies, then determine personality, and then spend some time getting to know the person. Over some time, they will reveal more about their personality.
  3. Ask open-ended questions and listen carefully – Define a situation and ask how the candidate will deal with it. Create about 3 questions that will reveal different aspects of their thinking skills, such as problem solving, creative thinking, sequencing, and reasoning, and to get insights on their thinking and experience.
  4. Create success by developing an assimilation process – Develop an entry process and a checklist of information to transfer. Fitting the new person into the culture is as important as the hiring process. You can’t leave this to chance.
  5. Define performance expectations – In addition to defining the person’s role and responsibility, define what you want them to accomplish monthly and annually, and then schedule check-in points weekly to have an opportunity for coaching and course correction.

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

Subscribe to The Transformational Leadership Strategist by Email

(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

Resources

Let’s Chat About Leadership…

This blog series appears on Tuesdays, and focuses on resources that I use as I pace my ability to continually strive for my greatest effectiveness. Leaders get things done. In order to accomplish this objective, it’s important to have the necessary skills and systems in place. I have tried many things over many years and have settled on what’s simple, reliable, and consistent.

Each resource will appear under one or more of my four leadership principles:
  1. Foundations: Clarity of purpose and outcomes, and equipping oneself for excellence;
  2. Relationships: Building and maintaining healthy and effective relationships;
  3. Systems: Tools and processes for leading and empowering transformation; and
  4. Balance: Managing multiple priorities and managing self.

Each resource I blog about is one I have tested and used personally. I do not make money on these referrals unless specifically stated in the post.

Today’s resource:

Nutrition at a Cellular Level

I lead better because my body stays healthy. Many of the vitamins and supplements on the market do not make any difference in my health. It’s time to throw most of them in the trash. There’s no system for testing and validating the quality of supplements and/or their effectiveness. Some of them, reportedly, don’t have the amount of what they claim to have in the bottle. The industry is bringing in billions of dollars with some good and some questionable products.

I’m throwing away my vitamins!

We are taking pills that really don’t feed us at a cellular level. Products are not bioavailable and are not easily assimilated in our bodies. They are missing the synergistic cofactors that make everything work. An isolate is a single nutrient that is missing the other companion nutrient to make it effective. There are so many factors to consider.

Approximately forty micronutrients are essential for normal metabolism. According to Dr. Bruce Ames, “micronutrient deficiency can mimic radiation (or chemicals) in damaging DNA by causing single- and double-strand breaks, oxidative lesions, or both,” which in turn are the root causes of most diseases. DNA damage occurs when vitamins, minerals, and food sources for these vitamins and minerals, are deficient.

In addition to preventing or repairing DNA damage, other micronutrients are needed to activate enzymes involved in important metabolic pathways that are derailed in the aging process. Yet most multivitamin supplements, even those labeled as “anti-aging,” are missing many of these key micronutrients.

I’ve been a serious student of nutrition for many years. The body of research is extensive, but only if you know where to find it. Nutritional research is very different from medical research. We need to have the combined knowledge from both of those disciplines.

Recently, I was given a month’s supply of HealthyCell Plus. There’s one pill for the morning and one for night. Almost immediately, I noticed a difference – I was able to focus better, I could sleep better, and I was energized. No other product has ever had this effect on me – ever!

Get Yours

I have arranged with the company to give you a discount. There’s a catch – you will feel better and function better, so you will want to continue taking the product. Therefore, don’t try it if you don’t want to function better.

Also, I agreed to share when there is a benefit from recommending a product or service. With each purchase, this company is making a donation to SynerVision Leadership Foundation to support its work with community organizations and religious institutions.

Click on this link to learn about the product, the research behind the product, the medical endorsements for the product, and how to get your free sample –  http://www.healthycell.com/hughballou/o

To get a $10 discount on a purchase, use the code HB10

The best leaders care for self in a variety of ways. Having good health is essential.

I’d like to hear about your experience with HealthyCell.

 

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

Subscribe to The Transformational Leadership Strategist by Email

(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

 

Hugh Ballou on March 6th, 2015

Blogs of Note for the Week Ending March 6, 2015

5 blogs that matterEvery day I learn something that advances my leadership knowledge and competency. Here are quotes from 5 blogs that got my attention this week. I don’t benefit from reposting any of these posts. Sometimes, I don’t even know the writer. However, I do read and personally grow my knowledge by reading posts that challenge my thinking and get me to think outside my old paradigm. It’s not important that you agree with any of these writers. It’s only important that you think. I hope you will find some new sources of inspiration with these posts. Here’s the next group of 5 in the series:

 

Travis Bradberry

12 Things You Must Never Reveal About Yourself At Work

Travis BradberryYou can’t build a strong professional network if you don’t open up to your colleagues; but doing so is tricky, because revealing the wrong things can have a devastating effect on your career.

Sharing the right aspects of yourself in the right ways is an art form. Disclosures that feel like relationship builders in the moment can wind up as obvious no-nos with hindsight.

The trick is to catch yourself before you cross that line, because once you share something, there is no going back.

Read the post…

 

Frank Sonnenberg

5 Ingredients of Superior Leadership: Guest Post by @FSonnenberg

Frank SonnerbergSuperior leaders achieve success by setting the bar high, encouraging teamwork, promoting win-win relationships, and demanding everyone’s best effort. Superior leaders win the support of their constituents by earning their trust and respect. This is achieved through powerful ideas, personal expertise, and impeccable integrity rather than through their position or by “pulling rank.” In sum, superior leaders hire great people, train them well, inspire them, and then get out of their way.

  • Vision. Superior leaders are visionaries with a “can-do” attitude. They take on the impossible, while their timid colleagues look for the exits. In the process, great leaders confront issues and obstacles head-on and make decisions that position their organizations successfully for the future. This means that their decisions won’t always be popular, but they will be considered deliberate and fair; short-term results won’t always be stellar, but long-term investments will secure a brighter future. These leaders won’t always be loved, but they will be trusted and respected.
  • Conviction. Superior leaders have…

Read the post...

 

Sam Horn

Create, Don’t Copy

Sam HornMy first question to my new client was, “So, what’s your topic and approach?”

He responded, “My topic is innovation. I developed my methodology by reading everyone’s books on this subject, collecting the best tips and synthesizing them into a 10-step plan.”

I looked at him, a little shocked that the irony of this hadn’t occurred to him.

I said, “Well, you asked me to be honest with you, so here’s my professional opinion. That’s not synthesizing; that’s stealing.”

Now, it was his turn to be a little shocked. “But that’s research. That’s what everyone told me to do.”

I responded, “Reading other people’s books on your topic and then using their material makes you derivative at best, plagiaristic at worst. If meeting planners wanted to know what these other experts say about innovation, they’d hire them to speak. They’re paying to hear your insights, not to hear a book report.”

“But how am I supposed to come up with content?” he asked, genuinely puzzled.

“You create your own.”

Read the post…

 

Guy Kawasaki

The Art of Simple Questions: How Simple Questions Lead to Great Innovations

Guy KawasakiThere is a myth that successful companies begin with grandiose ambitions. The implication is that entrepreneurs should start with megalomaniac goals in order to succeed. To the contrary, my observation is that great companies began by wondering about simple things, and this leads to asking simple questions that beget companies:

  • Therefore, what? This question arises when you spot or predict a trend and wonder about its consequences. It works like this: “Everyone will have a smartphone with a camera and Internet access.” Therefore, what? “They will be able to take pictures and share them.” Therefore, what? “We should create an app that lets people upload their photos, rate the photos of others, and post comments.” And, voila, there’s Instagram. (Inspired by The Art of Profitability by Adrian Slywotzsky)

Read the post…

 

Joel Brown

6 Lessons of Success We Can All Learn from Dale Carnegie

Joel BrownDale Carnegie’s Keys To Success

1. Take a Chance

Do not settle for mediocrity or set your sights too low. You might be selling yourself short by opting to be too safe. To soar above the masses and an average life you should look and aim farther and back up your ambition with sincere hard work.

Treat life as a game and do not take it too seriously. Push the envelope to progress as much as possible with your God-given talents.

2. Be Enthusiastic

Read the post…

 

 

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

Subscribe to The Transformational Leadership Strategist by Email

(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

Tags: , , , , ,

Sharing Leadership Ideas from Real Life

ForumEach Thursday, I’ll launch a topic for discussion, dialogue, debate, and introspective conversation. In group facilitation situations, I ask the participants to reframe disagreement from the category of a “weapon” to the category of a “creative tool.” This change in paradigm allows for very lively and productive discussions to happen. It takes away the risk of feeling like participants are criticizing each other and allows them to be free to point to ideas and concepts without having to pretend to be polite or pretend to agree. We have been conditioned to feel that disagreement is not polite. In fact, disagreement is a way to be in integrity.

We find that it’s okay to disagree. Many times we find new ideas, fresh perspectives, and opposite polarities that make sense. Healthy dialogue does not depend on everybody agreeing; in fact, if everybody agrees, it’s a boring discussion, and we might get trapped by not exposing blind spots that could limit our effectiveness as leaders and as an organization.

In that spirit, I offer a chance for dialogue on topics related to leadership. I will choose topics that have high visibility in the news or in certain communities of interest, such as business, entrepreneurship, religion, and social benefit work. I welcome suggestions for other topics. I’m sure that there are many, many to choose from.

Will you contribute your ideas? Please comment using the form below.

Today’s topic:

Racial profiling with local police departments…what is the leadership challenge, internal and external?

Here’s an article posted on March 5 in USA Today:

DOJ: Wilson won’t be charged in Ferguson fatal shooting

Read it HERE

I have become more aware of this problem since I have been attending a local group called “Dialogue on Race” where we have conversations about the issue and in which our local police chiefs and sheriff are participants. I now have a very different perspective on the situation.

Can we have dialogue and share thoughts as an information exchange and not as an argument? Many groups don’t have the skills or the culture to have open dialogue when there are differing perspectives.

 

Questions to answer:

  1. What is the leadership challenge with police racial profiling?
  2. How can community leaders respond to this challenge from both an internal perspective inside the municipality, and externally as a citizen?

Please comment below.

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

Subscribe to The Transformational Leadership Strategist by Email

(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

Tags: , , ,