Hugh Ballou banner image 0
Hugh Ballou banner image 0 Hugh Ballou banner image 1

Sharing Leadership Ideas from Real Life

ForumEach Thursday, I’ll launch a topic for discussion, dialogue, debate, and introspective conversation. In group facilitation situations, I ask the participants to reframe disagreement from the category of a “weapon” to the category of a “creative tool.” This change in paradigm allows for very lively and productive discussions to happen. It takes away the risk of feeling like participants are criticizing each other and allows them to be free to point to ideas and concepts without having to pretend to be polite or pretend to agree. We have been conditioned to feel that disagreement is not polite. In fact, disagreement is a way to be in integrity.

We find that it’s okay to disagree. Many times we find new ideas, fresh perspectives, and opposite polarities that make sense. Healthy dialogue does not depend on everybody agreeing; in fact, if everybody agrees, it’s a boring discussion, and we might get trapped by not exposing blind spots that could limit our effectiveness as leaders and as an organization.

In that spirit, I offer a chance for dialogue on topics related to leadership. I will choose topics that have high visibility in the news or in certain communities of interest, such as business, entrepreneurship, religion, and social benefit work. I welcome suggestions for other topics. I’m sure that there are many, many to choose from.

Will you contribute your ideas? Please comment using the form below.

Today’s topic:

Racial profiling with local police departments…what is the leadership challenge, internal and external?

Here’s an article posted on March 5 in USA Today:

DOJ: Wilson won’t be charged in Ferguson fatal shooting

Read it HERE

I have become more aware of this problem since I have been attending a local group called “Dialogue on Race” where we have conversations about the issue and in which our local police chiefs and sheriff are participants. I now have a very different perspective on the situation.

Can we have dialogue and share thoughts as an information exchange and not as an argument? Many groups don’t have the skills or the culture to have open dialogue when there are differing perspectives.

 

Questions to answer:

  1. What is the leadership challenge with police racial profiling?
  2. How can community leaders respond to this challenge from both an internal perspective inside the municipality, and externally as a citizen?

Please comment below.

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

Subscribe to The Transformational Leadership Strategist by Email

(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

Tags: , , ,

Over-functioning is irresponsible responsibility. – Murray Bowen

OverfunctionWe, as leaders, influence everyone in our presence. The orchestra conductor influences how the instrumentalists play: just playing the notes, or playing with passion. The conductor does not tell the orchestra how to play their instruments or play those instruments for them.

Many leaders struggle with underfunctioning staff, boards, volunteers, etc. and are not aware that they have potentially caused that problem with their overfunctioning presence.

In the recent post, “The Drawbacks Of An Overfunctioning Leader,Geri Scazzero made these points about how overfunctioning causes problems:

1. Overfunctioning Disguises Itself As Caring

2. Overfunctioning Perpetuates Immaturity

3. Overfunctioning Prevents Me From Focusing On My Own Life Direction

4. Overfunctioning Erodes My Spiritual Life

5. Overfunctioning Destroys Community

Read the post HERE 

The unintentional role that leaders play in problems is elusive.

Here are ways that the Transformational Leader creates balance and prevents overfunctioning:

  1. Define what to delegate: Trying to do it all is the first trap for leaders. We know how it’s supposed to work, therefore, we attempt to model by doing it rather that teaching others how to do whatever “it” is. Define your major skills and your gaps and find the most competent person to fill the gap. Define the end result clearly and then create a process to coach that person into higher functioning.
  2. Learn to delegate: It’s easy to say, “delegate more,” however learning how delegation works is a challenge for many leaders. Define the end result, allow the other person to define the steps with your approval, and create touch points on a regular basis to make corrections and to mentor – this is not micromanaging!
  3. Do not micromanage: Micromanagement is a form of overfunctioning. Don’t do it.
  4. Work on self: Learn to manage anxiety and learn to listen, observe, and ask good questions. Leaders who don’t know how to manage self fall into the habit of overfunctioning by over talking, over managing, and exerting too much pressure where it’s not warranted.

Autocratic leadership is a form of overfunctioning. Please give me your comments below.

 

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

Subscribe to The Transformational Leadership Strategist by Email

(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

Tags: , , , ,

Resources

Let’s Chat About Leadership…

This blog series appears on Tuesdays, and focuses on resources that I use as I pace my ability to continually strive for my greatest effectiveness. Leaders get things done. In order to accomplish this objective, it’s important to have the necessary skills and systems in place. I have tried many things over many years and have settled on what’s simple, reliable, and consistent.

Each resource will appear under one or more of my four leadership principles:
  1. Foundations: Clarity of purpose and outcomes, and equipping oneself for excellence;
  2. Relationships: Building and maintaining healthy and effective relationships;
  3. Systems: Tools and processes for leading and empowering transformation; and
  4. Balance: Managing multiple priorities and managing self.

Each resource I blog about is one I have tested and used personally. I do not make money on these referrals unless specifically stated in the post.

Today’s resource:

Important Books for a Leader’s Library

One of the best resources for any leader is having a good library of relevant books. I have so many books that give me good ideas that I will have to share them over several blog posts. This is post #1.

Under each title I will explain WHY I am recommending this book. Each title has a link to Amazon. Most of the books are available in Kindle or print, and some are available as audiobooks. There is an affiliate fee from each purchase that goes to my nonprofit foundation, SynerVision Leadership Foundation.

 

Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action

by Simon Sinek

Start with WhyWhat it’s about: Many people start talking about the what with their organization, product or service. People really don’t care until they know why it’s important to them. Simon Sinek also has a TED Talk on this topic.

Why I think it’s relevant: This book completely revised my thinking and my leadership coaching practice. This simple reframing can energize any sales or capital presentation. I refer to it often. This is an essential paradigm shift for any leader, whether in the church, community foundation, start-up entrepreneur, or corporate executive.

Get the book

 

Extraordinary Relationships: A New Way of Thinking About Human Interactions

by Roberta Gilbert

Extraordinary RelationshipsWhat it’s about: This book reveals a different perspective on leadership. This teaches us about ourselves and how we have been shaped by our family of origin and how we function in any group emotional situation. It’s about management of self. This book explains Bowen Family Systems, a new way of thinking about human systems.

Why I think it’s relevant:  I realized, from this book and live seminars with the author and 3 years of personal coaching, that I was really doing things wrong. I am now able to observe personal interactions through a different lens, stay calm, address complex issues and behaviors through systems thinking, and differentiate myself as a high-functioning leader.

Get the Book

 

The Tao of Leadership

by John Heider

Tao of LeadershipWhat it’s about: This book frames leadership in a very different light. We must learn to observe before we intervene. There are many short chapters with really important thoughts.

 

Why I think it’s relevant: Like the Bowen Systems book above, this little, easy-to-read book has reframed my perspective on leadership. Leaders do too much, intervene too much, and talk too much. There is a better way.
Get the Book

 

Really Bad PowerPoint (and how to avoid it)

by Seth Godin

Really Bad PowerPointWhat it’s about: This book, as the title states, defines why PowerPoint presentations are so bad. He then goes on to give his recommendations.

Why I think it’s relevant: I am a teacher, seminar leader, and a public speaker. Knowing this information helps me keep my audience awake and allows them to learn more and retain more. It’s simple, but I had a hard time changing…I’ve got it now!

Get the Book

 

 

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

Subscribe to The Transformational Leadership Strategist by Email

(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

 

Tags: , , , ,

Hugh Ballou on March 2nd, 2015

A coach is someone who can give correction without causing resentment.” – Coach John Wooden

Leading Teams

So, what’s the problem?

It’s a mystery that so many top leaders have trouble correcting the actions or behaviors of people they are responsible for leading. There’s a fear that making a correction will hurt someone’s feelings or that the leader won’t be liked if they are critical.

If the musical conductor doesn’t make corrections in the performance of the players, then they are perceived to be incompetent.

For example, the conductor stops the rehearsal to tell the trumpets that the phrase is too loud and to take it down one dynamic level. This is a specific diagnosis of the situation. This is factual and not a criticism of the trumpet players. They understand the situation and expect that the conductor will make the necessary corrections. They are in the back of the orchestra, they play a loud instrument, and they can’t judge the balance from their position. If the conductor does not make the needed correction, then he or she is perceived to be less than competent.

Why don’t leaders ask for what they need?

Move the example above into non-musical settings. If the leader does not make the necessary correction, they are perceived to be a poor leader. Leaders do the right thing every time regardless of how they feel.

When I work with leaders on team issues, most of the time leaders are reluctant to make corrections. Putting off the inevitable creates problems. Intervene at the first sign of a problem. Assuming that the person will self-correct or that the problem will go away is not accurate and, in fact, insignificant issues become large problems. Small conflict turns into a disaster of nuclear proportions. Paying the upfront cost of dealing with the problem is far less disruptive than waiting until it gets to a higher level and a disaster.

Waiting costs money, time, and relationships!

Waiting makes no sense. Waiting causes loss of time, loss of money, and possibly damaged relationships which cannot be mended.

How do I learn more?

Get my free ebook, Creating and Sustaining Healthy Teams: Preventing and Managing Team Conflict. You will find diagnostic, preventative, prescriptive, and resource sections that will provide more on this topic. Then send me an email with an answer to the following question:

What’s your biggest team leadership issue?

 

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

Subscribe to The Transformational Leadership Strategist by Email

(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Hugh Ballou on February 27th, 2015

Blogs of Note for the Week Ending February 27, 2015

5 blogs that matterEvery day I learn something that advances my leadership knowledge and competency. Here are quotes from 5 blogs that got my attention this week. I don’t benefit from reposting any of these posts. Sometimes, I don’t even know the writer. However, I do read and personally grow my knowledge by reading posts that challenge my thinking and get me to think outside my old paradigm. It’s not important that you agree with any of these writers. It’s only important that you think. I hope you will find some new sources of inspiration with these posts. Here’s the next group of 5 in the series:

 

Daniel Goh

How To Finance A Small Business

Daniel GohHave you been dreaming of starting your own small business? If so, you are not alone. Many people want to go into business for themselves. Unfortunately, the thing that usually holds them back is not having enough money to get the business off the ground. This lack of financing has killed many small businesses before they even get started. Fortunately, today’s world offers many ways for entrepreneurs to get financing for small business ventures.

Here are some ways for you to finance a small business:

1. Friends and family.

If you have some close friends and family who are willing to loan you some money to get your business started, this is always a good way to go. Because they love you, these people will not be constantly calling you and demanding an installment payment for the money they lent to you. They will more than likely give you all the time you need to pay them back. Also, they will probably not charge you any interest on the money they lend you. This fact alone will save you an enormous amount of money.

2. Small business loan.

Read the post…

 

Raoul Davis

4 Things U.S. Business Owners Can Learn From Their Counterparts Around The World

Raoul DavisThere’s a lot of advice out there for entrepreneurs, along with common misconceptions touted as conventional wisdom. In his book, “The Real Truth About Success: What the Top 1% Do Differently, Why They Won’t Tell You, and How You Can Do It Anyway,” author Garrison Wynn reveals that the top 1% of successful business people let myths about success persist. So while this isn’t reassuring — and Wynn offers some good insights on what to do — I propose we look beyond our conventional sources of U.S.-based business coaches to more global perspective while asking ourselves an uncomfortable question: “Why is the success rate for businesses in the U.S. so low?”

Read the post…

 

Nellie Akalp

8 things to do before launching a business this year

Nellie AkalpThinking about starting a business this year? Most likely you already know that you need to build out your product, service, website, but what about everything else?

A booming business isn’t born overnight. It takes patience and hard work to lay the right groundwork. Whether you plan to build a mobile app or digital media consulting group, here are eight things to consider as you get ready to launch:

Read the post…

 

Mark Suster

Startup Advice

Mark SusterI usually tell people that everything I learned about being an entrepreneur I learned by F’ing up at my first company.

I think the sign of a good entrepreneur is the ability to spot your mistakes, correct quickly and not repeat the mistakes. I made plenty of mistakes.

Below are some of the lessons I learned along the way.  If there’s a link on a title below I’ve written the post, if not I plan to.  The summary of each posting will be here but the full article requires you to follow the links.

Read the post…

 

 

Martin Zwilling

Bootstrapping Organic Growth Makes Startup Sense

Martin ZwillingWhen someone asks me for the best way to fund a startup, I always say bootstrap it, meaning fund it yourself and grow organically. Bootstrapping avoids all the cost, pain, and distractions of finding angels or VCs, and allows you to keep control and all your hard-earned equity for yourself. Despite all the focus you hear on external investors, over 90% of startups today are self-funded.

I grew to appreciate this approach much more when I interviewed a popular serial entrepreneur, Rich Christiansen a while back, who has done almost 30 businesses wholly by bootstrapping. He published a book with Ron Porter, titled “Bootstrap Business”, that provides a wealth of practical examples and advice on this subject.

The essence of his approach is to dedicate yourself to becoming a frugal minimalist in everything you do. I like his approach, and have extracted some tips from his book and other sources on how to do it:

  1. Use a virtual office. Rent is one of the biggest expenses for any business. If you can, start your business in your home office, basement or garage (Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, and many other legends used this approach).

Read the post…

 

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

Subscribe to The Transformational Leadership Strategist by Email

(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

Sharing Leadership Ideas from Real Life

ForumEach Thursday, I’ll launch a topic for discussion, dialogue, debate, and introspective conversation. In group facilitation situations, I ask the participants to reframe disagreement from the category of a “weapon” to the category of a “creative tool.” This change in paradigm allows for very lively and productive discussions to happen. It takes away the risk of feeling like participants are criticizing each other and allows them to be free to point to ideas and concepts without having to pretend to be polite or pretend to agree. We have been conditioned to feel that disagreement is not polite. In fact, disagreement is a way to be in integrity.

We find that it’s okay to disagree. Many times we find new ideas, fresh perspectives, and opposite polarities that make sense. Healthy dialogue does not depend on everybody agreeing; in fact, if everybody agrees, it’s a boring discussion, and we might get trapped by not exposing blind spots that could limit our effectiveness as leaders and as an organization.

In that spirit, I offer a chance for dialogue on topics related to leadership. I will choose topics that have high visibility in the news or in certain communities of interest, such as business, entrepreneurship, religion, and social benefit work. I welcome suggestions for other topics. I’m sure that there are many, many to choose from.

Will you contribute your ideas? Please comment using the form below.

Today’s topic:

Do the ailments defined by Pope Frances apply to corporate culture and nonprofit organizations as well?

Here are his 15 ailments:

1) “The sickness of considering oneself ‘immortal’, ‘immune’ or ‘indispensable’

2) “‘Martha-ism’, or excessive industriousness

3) “The sickness of mental and spiritual hardening

4) “The ailment of excessive planning and functionalism

5) “Sickness of poor coordination

6) “Spiritual Alzheimer’s disease

7) “The ailment of rivalry and vainglory

8) “Existential schizophrenia

9) “Chatter, grumbling and gossip

10) “The sickness of deifying leaders

11) “The disease of indifference towards others

12) “The illness of the funereal face

13) “The disease of accumulation

14) “The ailment of closed circles”

15) The disease of worldly profit and exhibitionism

Read the article: http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/world/wp/2014/12/22/the-15-ailments-of-the-vatican-curia-according-to-pope-francis/

Questions to answer:

  1. Do these ailments apply to businesses? If so, which ones?
  2. Why is correcting these ailments important?

 

Please comment below.

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

Subscribe to The Transformational Leadership Strategist by Email

(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

Judge a man by his questions rather than his answers. – Voltaire

Questions

 

Transformational Leaders Lead with Good Questioning Skills

In Monday’s blog post this week, Leadership Skills: Transparency  I started sharing ideas about how transparency creates trust and also allows team members to function at a high level.

If the leader has all the answers and claims to be the only one with the right answers, it shuts down group energy and engagement. Mentoring leaders on teams to grow their skill is empowerment.

In other posts, I have written about listening skills and questioning skills. Asking good questions is an art, as well as a skill. The other part of questioning is listening carefully to answers and observing how people respond to the questions. Asking questions allows the leader to have insight into how people think, how they solve problems, and how they work together. Ask, listen, and then observe. That’s leadership.

Answering the questions yourself is a form of over-functioning. The reciprocity of over-functioning is under-functioning. The more the leader does, mostly with good intentions, the more under-functioning will occur in others. This is the single most troubling topic new clients share with me – the claim that the team does not accomplish what’s expected. Most of these leaders are totally unaware that they have set up this situation.

Here are my points to master in setting this dynamic of being sure that your team is right:

  1. Define and share values and principles: Be sure that everyone is using the same rule of measurement. Define the principles for making decisions that benefit the organization. Core values are the foundation, and principles are the guidelines for functioning.
  2. Define guiding principles for yourself: Management of self is the key to top-level leadership. If you want to change how others behave and function, begin by changing yourself. Others respond to what you do.
  3. Learn to listen: Most of the time, we as leaders talk too much. Observe, listen, think, and pause before responding. It’s amazing how powerful a leadership tool that is! Listening is a top-level leadership skill.
  4. Let others learn from their mistakes: Mentoring is different from micromanaging. Allow people to learn from small mistakes and then they are able to make bigger decisions. Delegation is multiplying your work.
  5. Learn to affirm: Many times we assume that others know how we feel about them and about their accomplishments. Be intentional about celebrating success and affirming people – be authentic and affirm what is true.

Invest in others and they will invest in you and your vision.

 

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

Subscribe to The Transformational Leadership Strategist by Email

(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

Tags: , , , , , ,

Resources

Let’s Chat About Leadership…

This blog series appears on Tuesdays, and focuses on resources that I use as I pace my ability to continually strive for my greatest effectiveness. Leaders get things done. In order to accomplish this objective, it’s important to have the necessary skills and systems in place. I have tried many things over many years and have settled on what’s simple, reliable, and consistent.

Each resource will appear under one or more of my four leadership principles:
  1. Foundations: Clarity of purpose and outcomes, and equipping oneself for excellence;
  2. Relationships: Building and maintaining healthy and effective relationships;
  3. Systems: Tools and processes for leading and empowering transformation; and
  4. Balance: Managing multiple priorities and managing self.

Each resource I blog about is one I have tested and used personally. I do not make money on these referrals unless specifically stated in the post.

Today’s resource:

Planning Power-Packed Meetings

The number one killer of team synergy…is…Boring, Unproductive Meetings!

Here is a “must read” post of mine, “An Agenda: The Enemy of Productivity in Meetings

Meetings are boring, so why don’t we change how we approach them? We have been taught bad techniques and skills, and we repeat them even though they don’t work!

It’s time to try something different.

First, read why you don’t want to use an agenda with the link above. Next, download my free report, “Conducting Power-Packed Meetings.” Go to this link called “Free Stuff” on my site.

Here’s a summary of the 10 tips from my report, which includes a video and a very valuable template for planning meetings.

The following is a list of Hugh’s 10 tips for Conducting Power-Packed Meetings.

  1. Clearly state the purpose for the meeting: Tell participants what the purpose of the meeting is. If you don’t have one…don’t have a meeting!
  2. Plan the meeting thoroughly: Planning is key! Spend 2 to 3 times the scheduled time for the meeting in planning the meeting…only if you want results.
  3. Identify the leader/moderator/facilitator of the meeting: Running meetings is a fine-tuned skill somewhat like directing a musical ensemble. It takes practice. If this is not you…delegate it.
  4. Begin and end on time: Start and end when you say…no exceptions. None! Respect those who have honored you by being on time.
  5. Design ways to prompt input from each attendee: If someone has been invited, ensure that they participate. Those who wait have been listening and thinking…what they will add could be a game changer.
  6. Create a group list of “norms” for process together: Allow the group, if it’s an ongoing group, to define how they will operate. This is a game changer.
  7. Record the group’s information where all can see: Tell people that you will send meeting notes and ask them to participate. It’s great to actually have their attention and to see faces, not the tops of heads.
  8. Review the entire process for the session at the beginning: Send the session “deliverables” a day before the meeting and review before you start. Also, define how you will get to the outcomes defined.
  9. Stay in control of the meeting: When people stray from the agreed upon topic and deliverables, bring them back, gently. Create a list of what you will not do…“Off-Limits.”
  10. Do not adjourn without setting accountability standards: Create an action plan and a communication plan for activating the deliverables, complete with the name of the champion and deadline.

If you have a bad musical rehearsal, then you are likely to have a bad performance. If you have bad meetings, why, then, do you expect to have good results in your organization? Rehearse for Success is my Leadership Principle #3 called Systems. Create the culture of high performance by setting a high standard and committing to consistency.

Get my free report here: http://synervision.us/free-stuff

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

Subscribe to The Transformational Leadership Strategist by Email

(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Hugh Ballou on February 23rd, 2015

Effective leaders are not always right. They ensure that leaders on their teams are. Leading is empowering others. – Hugh Ballou

Transparency

As leaders, we follow what we have been taught by habit, and mostly out of ignorance of what else to do. We respect those who have impacted our lives, unintentionally feeling obligated to do so. In my case, it’s a part of that inherited behavior of desiring to please others, whether it’s the right decision for me or not.

Being transparent means being vulnerable in many instances. If we are insecure about anything, then being transparent and vulnerable is a challenge.

There is a sense of false security in being autocratic, in that we control the flow of information, make the decisions, manage how things happen, and lead by the influence of power and, now, personal influence.

It’s far more difficult to lead collaboratively than authoritatively. So, why change?

Being transparent fosters energy in any group and allows others to own the outcomes and to establish peer-to-peer accountability. Transparency is, in fact, a primary leadership skill.

Transparency is a valuable leadership skill:

  1. To build trust: This is aligned with the Transformational Leadership trait of authenticity. Being authentic includes being transparent, if you adopt this style of leadership. Team members can trust a leader who doesn’t pretend to be something that he or she isn’t. This trust allows for relationships to grow organically, like ensemble happens with intentionality in musical groups. The leader must guide and nurture that process, but not control it. The musical conductor guides the process and allows space for others to function up.
  2. To focus on relationships: Insecure and autocratic leaders are focused on themselves and not on others. When leaders pay attention to team members and constantly work on relationship, it’s apparent and brings energy to the team. Reversing this paradigm allows the leader to have the bandwidth to pay attention to what others are doing, how they function, and to observe behaviors.
  3. To reframe influence: The leader who leads from the position of power and authority (I’m the Chairman and I make decisions) stifles group thinking, sidetracks creative collaboration, and intimidates others. We reframe from “Push” to “Pull” leadership.
  4. To encourage collaboration: If the leader has all the answers, then there’s no reason for others to participate. Transparency is knowing and sharing the truth, which is that you don’t have all the right answers. Rather than always being right, ensure that the team is always right, or that they learn from mistakes so that their competency is constantly growing.
  5. To foster authenticity: The last, and most impactful Transformational Leadership trait is to model what you preach. Being authentic means showing how to be authentic. When you don’t know, share that with the team. Nobody can have all the right answers. Model this trait and it will impact how others respond to you and other team members.

This is certainly not a comprehensive treatment of the topic. It’s intended to stimulate thinking and inspire a new paradigm for leading.

Do you agree?

 

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

Subscribe to The Transformational Leadership Strategist by Email

(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

 

Hugh Ballou on February 20th, 2015

Blogs of Note for the Week Ending February 20, 2015

5 blogs that matterEvery day I learn something that advances my leadership knowledge and competency. Here are quotes from 5 blogs that got my attention this week. I don’t benefit from reposting any of these posts. Sometimes, I don’t even know the writer. However, I do read and personally grow my knowledge by reading posts that challenge my thinking and get me to think outside my old paradigm. It’s not important that you agree with any of these writers. It’s only important that you think. I hope you will find some new sources of inspiration with these posts. Here’s the next group of 5 in the series:

 

Joe Pulizzi

33 Entrepreneurs Share Their Biggest Lessons Learned from Failure

Joe PulizziA successful career is like a rollercoaster with many ups and downs, whether you’re an employee or an entrepreneur. Understanding how to maintain your success and move past your failures can help you lead a more productive and fulfilling career.

To help provide some insight on how to navigate a career you’re proud of, I’ve asked 33 tech entrepreneurs to share some of their biggest lessons learned from their own failures.

Read the post…

 

Dan Waldschmidt

17 THINGS AWESOME PEOPLE DO THAT YOU SHOULD DO.

Dan WaldschmidtIf you want to accomplish your dreams, avoiding disaster isn’t good enough. And being good isn’t great enough. Even being great isn’t the same as being awesome. And being awesome isn’t easy.

In fact, achieving awesome is close to impossible.

All across the globe, ordinary people with driving ambition and brutally honest expectations rise to the challenge and do something that the rest of us can only call “awesome”.

Which begs an important question — “HOW”? 

How do some people crush it while you just seem to stay stuck?

Read the post…

 

Mike Brown

10 Meeting Spaces for Work at Home Professionals, Other than Starbucks

Mike BrownIf you are seeking meeting space outside a traditional office, you know the traditional options are Starbucks, Panera, or some local coffee shop. Those are okay places, but they’re typically crawling with people and you smell like coffee when you leave.

So what are other viable no-cost meeting space options for work at home professionals?

Yesterday, Barrett and I wound up meeting at a secondary food court in a mall for a change in venue. It was open, quiet, and very pleasant – if you ignored the major butt crack moment on the women cleaning the window at Loft.

Read the post...

 

Terri Klass

Four Critical Leadership Traits

Terri KlassHave you ever thought about what makes you an influential leader? I’m always on the hunt for insights and clues to why one leader is able to connect with their team and colleagues while another leader has such a challenging time building relationships. How is one leader able to rally their troops to face an uncertain challenge while another leader is standing on the front lines all by themselves?

I became intrigued with some research from The Center For Creative Leadership that involved interviews with both middle managers and CEO’s. According to their surveys, there are four critical leadership traits: integrity, bravery, perspective and social intelligence. As I read through the study, I began to think about the influential leaders I have worked with and how they live up to these four attributes.

1. Integrity

“Leaders with integrity act with authenticity and honesty by speaking the truth, presenting themselves in a genuine way with sincerity, showing no pretense, and taking responsibility for their own feelings and actions (Peterson & Seligman, 2004).”

Read the post…

 

Susan Mazza

The Big Little Leadership Idea

Susan MazzaWhile John Bell attained the position of CEO, I was drawn to his message because he exemplifies the every day leader.  Following is a guest post from John where he shares some wisdom from his newly released book, Do Less Better, as it applies to every one of us regardless of position or title.

Creative people and entrepreneurs hunt for big ideas every day. But what constitutes a big idea?

My definition is this: a big idea must first make sense of things; and secondly, a big idea must create impact.

When I was a boy, I was helping my father build a wooden deck. I asked if I could saw some of the boards.

Read the post…

 

 

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

Subscribe to The Transformational Leadership Strategist by Email

(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,