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Hugh Ballou on August 28th, 2015

Blogs of Note for the Week Ending August 28, 2015

5 blogs that matterEvery day I learn something that advances my leadership knowledge and competency. Here are quotes from 5 blogs that got my attention this week. I don’t benefit from reposting any of these posts. Sometimes, I don’t even know the writer. However, I do read and personally grow my knowledge by reading posts that challenge my thinking and get me to think outside my old paradigm. It’s not important that you agree with any of these writers. It’s only important that you think. I hope you will find some new sources of inspiration with these posts. Here’s the next group of 5 in the series:

 

 

Sharlyn Lauby

9 Public Speaking Tips for Your Next Business Presentation

Sharlyn LaubyI feel very fortunate that I learned about public speaking early in life. One of my first jobs was being a tour guide at an aquatic marine life theme park who has an Orcinus orca as their mascot. (I’ll let you guess which one!) While I didn’t realize it at the time, the experience was priceless.

After attending a few events lately, I wanted to share a few observations about public speaking. We’ve all heard the old cliché about more people fearing public speaking than death. As business professionals, it’s essential to learn how to speak in front of groups. It’s part of our job. Even if we don’t do it every day. Let me share a couple of examples that might hit home:

At conferences, major sponsors are invited to speak about their company at the podium. Or a volunteer leader is asked to introduce a speaker.

Read the post… 

 

Tim Kuppler 

Dispelling Five Popular Myths about Culture Change 

Tim KupplerWe’re in an interesting time where “modern” organizations are embracing culture as a key to success while many traditional (translation = slow) organizations have not seen the light. Culture was the Merriam-Webster “word of the year” in 2014 and culture content continues to dominate the popular press.

Unfortunately, it was the word of the year because of the increase in the number of times people were looking up the definition. We have a long way to go to build some clarity with this deep topic but we can learn from many experts to accelerate our culture learning curve and improve business results.

Dispelling the Myths

As the interest in workplace culture has grown, so have a number of myths that must be dispelled if we’ll ever see widespread progress.

Read the post… 

 

Brian Sooy 

Questions to Ask Before You Join a Board 

Brian SooyTen years ago, I received a call asking, “Would you be interested in joining our board?” It would have been helpful to have a list of questions to ask current board members and the executive director before I began this journey.

I didn’t ask to be considered for the board; I wasn’t looking to join one. I don’t know if the executive director knew exactly who she would be getting by asking, or why the current board thought I would be a good fit.

Looking back, I wonder if I would still be invited. We’re all ten years older; ten years the wiser (at least I prefer to think I am; this is where I open myself up to wisecracks from my closest friends). But am I the ideal board member? Now that we’re all wiser and I’m exiting the board, whom should we be looking for to replace me and ensure the organization’s future success?

Read the post…

 

Shane Atchison 

Workplace Culture: the Good, the Bad, and the Amazon Effect

Shane AtchisonLast week, the business world was all abuzz with the New York Times article on the culture of Amazon.com. It turned out to be a two-sided coin. On one hand, the company is incredibly successful and empowers its employees to do great things. On the other hand, it has a work culture that is, to put it charitably, ultra-demanding and competitive. Apparently, criticism in meetings can be so harsh that people break down in tears under the pressure.

Predictably, many present and former Amazon employees spent the week in a raging online debate about the merits and morality of the company’s culture. Some criticized it for its take-no-prisoners approach (and no less for its lack of women in upper management). Others were saying that, duh, if you want to accomplish great things, you have to have an aggressive culture. Get over it.

Read the post…

 

Mike Figliuolo 

11 Business Lessons You Can’t Survive Without 

Mike FiguoloRunning a business is an exercise in fear, excitement, fear, elation, fear, hard work, and fear. Did I mention fear? In the 11 years I’ve been running my firm, I’ve learned a few indispensable lessons that apply no only to entrepreneurs but to business folks in all walks of life.

1. Your business will change. Either you can change it or the market will change it for you. Change is the constant. It’s easy to get locked in on a model that works to the exclusion of other opportunities or ideas. For the longest time I railed against putting our content in video form.

Read the post…

 

 

 

 

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

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(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

Sharing Leadership Ideas from Real Life

I’m Hugh Ballou, an entrepreneur. This post is about Politicians…Leaders or Not?

ForumOn Thursdays, I’ll often launch a topic for discussion, dialogue, debate, and introspective conversation. In group facilitation situations, I ask the participants to reframe disagreement from the category of a “weapon” to the category of a “creative tool.” This change in paradigm allows for very lively and productive discussions to happen. It takes away the risk of feeling like participants are criticizing each other and allows them to be free to point to ideas and concepts without having to pretend to be polite or pretend to agree. We have been conditioned to feel that disagreement is not polite. In fact, disagreement is a way to be in integrity.

We find that it’s okay to disagree. Many times we find new ideas, fresh perspectives, and opposite polarities that make sense. Healthy dialogue does not depend on everybody agreeing; in fact, if everybody agrees, it’s a boring discussion, and we might get trapped by not exposing blind spots that could limit our effectiveness as leaders and as an organization.

In that spirit, I offer a chance for dialogue on topics related to leadership. I will choose topics that have high visibility in the news or in certain communities of interest, such as business, entrepreneurship, religion, and social benefit work. I welcome suggestions for other topics. I’m sure that there are many, many to choose from.

Will you contribute your ideas? Please comment using the form below.

Today’s topic:

Is Donald Trump a Leader or a Bully?

Donald Trump

As of the date of this blog post, Donald Trump has taken a major lead in the 2017 Presidential election. He really is not looking to please anyone; in fact, he’s insulted many people. There are lots of people who are indicating that he’s their candidate in the early polls. Is this agreement with him or a vote against the status quo?

Questions to answer:

  1. Is Trump showing effective leadership principles? Why or why not?
  2. Is he getting traction because people are voting in the polls for him, or are they voting against the status quo?
  3. Is there a message here that people want to hear from their next president? How is that message showing effective leadership?
  4. Is Donald Trump a leader or a bully?

Please comment below.

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

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(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.
Hugh Ballou on August 26th, 2015

“No one ever complains about a speech being too short!” – Ira Hayes

CEO Space InternationalCEO Space SNAP: Super Networking Accelerated Potential

The SNAP is a great networking tool created by Berny Dohrman and Bob Proctor 25 years ago to empower people to connect with more people in less time. It’s basically a modified elevator speech, in that it’s short, precise, to the point, and powerful. Within the highly refined and specific culture of CEO Space, it’s a way for other participants to know how to help you, refer you, or respond in some other way to filling the gaps in your process of developing your enterprise.

Presenting the SNAP is also rehearsal. It’s an opportunity to rehearse a presentation over and over and test the response in real time. The desired response is for others to give you a “See Me” card with their contact information and a note on how they can help with your request.

The system is good, although the skill of the participants is not always consistent.

A SNAP is a presentation. Leaders are influencers. Presenting is influence. We influence others to respond to our call-to-action. We MUST define WHAT we want people to do with highly specific and compelling language.

The basic flaw is that we recite a script rather than tell a story. People respond to a story if they see themselves as involved in the story or its emotion.

Storytelling is an art as well as a skill. The skill improves with rehearsal. The story improves with the artistry of presentation.

A leader is first and foremost a person of influence. We must first define the following in order to be a successful influencer:

  1. Who We Want to Influence: Define your target market or you risk not having any market. El Mondo is everybody which equates to nobody. Pick your niche and pitch that niche.
  2. What We Want Them To Do: The weakest part of the SNAPs that I hear is the call-to-action. We MUST tell the listener what we want them to do. It’s that simple, however simple is complex to create. Have your coach help with this one.
  3. Why They Should Care: As Simon Sinek shares in his book, Start with Why, nobody will care about the what until they know why. This is a critical paradigm to master and, again, a complex one to create.
  4. Our Passion: Be in touch with your passion for what you are presenting. Keep the image of your passion in your spirit and it will be present in your story. Words don’t fully influence without injection of your passion.
  5. The Relationship: Communication is facilitated by relationship. Be aware that you have and are in relationship with the person to whom you are presenting. If you don’t care about them, then why should they care about you?

If you aren’t getting the desired response, then look at yourself. Are you reciting an ineffective script or are you skillfully presenting by using the artistry of storytelling?

By the way, the best stories are short.

 

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

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Hugh Ballou on August 24th, 2015

You have inherited a lifetime of tribulation. Everybody has inherited it. Take it over, make the most of it and when you have decided you know the right way, do the best you can with it. – Murray Bowen

Murray Bowen

Murray Bowen

Over the past 5 years of study of Bowen Systems, I have gained specific knowledge that helps me with my work with organizational leaders in many fields. What I didn’t use in my work previously, is defining Guiding Principles. I used to work with people defining organizational and personal core values. Now I realize that core values are great, but they are static definitions and not active statements for decision making, both personally and for teams.

I’ve adopted the following top 10 list for going one more step in defining the principled leader.

Ten tips for being a successful principled leader:

  1. Develop and follow personal Guiding Principles: Leaders are primarily influencers. This step is crucial in being the person of influence. Creating and utilizing guiding principles in writing is the key. By the way, when these are shared with people who matter, they are more effective. Accountability is empowerment and collaboration.
  2. Align personal core values with organizational core values: Over 90% of the leaders that I begin work with cannot define their core values. These are the foundation for strategic planning and the start for developing guiding principles. Define personal and organizational values and then compare. If these are not in alignment, then you cannot be successful.
  3. Always remain in integrity: Integrity means always doing the right thing and doing the right thing when nobody is looking. Once perjured under oath in a court of law, all your testimony is worthless. It only takes once of not being in integrity to cancel out your reputation.
  4. Manage conduct and language: You are the leader and you can do whatever you please…not exactly true! You can choose to conduct yourself in a nonprofessional manner or to use abusive language or to swear. There are consequences in those choices, however. If you are a person of influence, then how do you want to be perceived and who do you want to influence? Every action and every word counts. There is no eraser for bad conduct or bad language.
  5. Focus on giving value: Nobody likes a person who must win all the time, and nobody wants to listen to a person who only talks about themselves. There’s a reciprocity in giving value to others. Good and bad things come back around to each of us. Ask what others need and soon they will be asking you the same.
  6. Take responsibility for personal mistakes: Blame is not a good leadership tool. Typically leaders cause problems that they blame others for. Step up to owning your own gaps and consider mistakes a learning opportunity. Be transparent or your team members will show you that they know you aren’t perfect. Remember, perfect is the enemy of good.
  7. Seek consensus and not compromise: Consensus is a decision worked out through group process and backed by relationship. It’s not win/lose. It’s not a power play. It’s not demanding your own way. It’s not compromise. In a compromise, everyone gives up something and it is perceived to be a lose/lose result. Consensus is win/win or no deal.
  8. Associate with people of integrity: We become like the top 5 people we associate with. Our income reflects that of the crowd we hang with. Our influence is amplified by the friends we keep. Is your sphere of influence adding value to your end game? Are you bringing value to theirs, as well?
  9. Make principled decisions and not feeling decisions: Murray Bowen has been quoted as having said, “It’s ok to have empathy for someone, but you must get out of it quickly.” Feeling sorry for someone doesn’t help you or them. We get anxious when guided by emotions, and make feeling decisions rather than thinking decisions. Always check yourself when making important decisions. Maybe you can check with your accountability partner for feedback. Oh, you don’t have an accountability partner? So, why not?
  10. Practice what you preach: Our children, our teams, our musical ensembles, and our friends will be influenced by what we say and do. As the old saying goes, “The sermon you preach with your life is louder than the sermon you preach with your mouth.” The leader influences the culture. Changing how we act will change how others respond.

My principles are shared publicly HERE.

All comments are welcome.

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

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(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

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Hugh Ballou on August 21st, 2015

Blogs of Note for the Week Ending August 21, 2015

5 blogs that matterEvery day I learn something that advances my leadership knowledge and competency. Here are quotes from 5 blogs that got my attention this week. I don’t benefit from reposting any of these posts. Sometimes, I don’t even know the writer. However, I do read and personally grow my knowledge by reading posts that challenge my thinking and get me to think outside my old paradigm. It’s not important that you agree with any of these writers. It’s only important that you think. I hope you will find some new sources of inspiration with these posts. Here’s the next group of 5 in the series:

 

 

Sebastien Boyer

4 Tips On How to Use LinkedIn To Build Powerful Influence

Sebastien BoyerEver stood in the corner at a networking event and felt like a dork?

Focusing on business networking in just a traditional way is a dumb idea.

It doesn’t scale.

Often ineffective and it can be a total waste of time. Trying to suck up at breakfast business networking events and pushing your business card under everyone’s nose is just plain annoying.

Read the post…

 

Michael McKinney

Attitude of Wisdom

Michael McKinneyAmerican essayist Norman Cousins wrote, “Wisdom consists of the anticipation of consequences.” Wisdom is about the thinking through of thoughts, behaviors and actions and seeing their relationships. It is seeing how things are connected. It is easy to get so caught up in what we are doing that we operate as though we are in a vacuum. Yale University professor Robert Sternberg explained that one reason smart people are sometimes inexplicably stupid is that they think they have overcome the problem of consequences.

Read the post…

 

 

Dan Oestreich

Relationships – Reciprocity and Conflict

Dan OestreichLet’s say there is a scale of effective relating — it goes from high trust and collaboration at one pole to destructive hostility at the other. In between there are some intermediary points, so that we get something like the following.

One way conflict in this relationship shows up is via what I believe I am expressing toward you vs. what I believe I am receiving from you.

Read the post…

 

Blair Glaser

What Type of Narcissist are You?

Blair GlasserIn the middle of a risky conversation with a steady boyfriend, one in which we were confessing our doubts about moving to the next level, he brought up the dreaded N word. The other N word. He was concerned that I might be a narcissist.

Gulp. I had just come from a conversation with a colleague who referred to the selfie stick as “the narcisstick,” complaining about our culture’s bloated obsession with self-promotion, and, since I do a fair amount of promoting for my online consulting business, I hoped that my newish boyfriend was reacting to that

But just to be sure, I asked him what specific behaviors of mine fall into the N word category: “Do I talk about myself too much? Am I inconsiderate of your feelings and needs? Is it my social media use?

“No. It’s not that at all,” he reassured me. “It’s when you are in a group of people, you act cold and stand-offish, like you are above everybody.”

“Ohhhh,” I sighed with relief. “You mean I’m arrogant!”

Yup, I’ve gained some less-than-attractive coping mechanisms to deal with my social anxiety. We laughed at how, even though he saw them as the same thing, I’d rather be accused of arrogance than narcissism. The conversation, in addition to opening up a new world of understanding between us, provided a new addition to the list of the ways the word narcissist is being used these days.

Read the post…

 

Jesse Lyn Stoner

Dynamic Duos: How Introverts and Extroverts Create Breakthrough Results

Jesse Lyn StonerWhat do these famous pairs have in common?

Lennon and McCartney

Burns and Allen

Jobs and Wozniak

Lerner and Loewe

Siskel and Ebert

They are all dynamic duos: extrovert – introvert pairs who created something together that neither of them would have done on their own.

What’s their secret?

Too often extroverts complain to each other about their introverted peers.

  • You never know what they’re thinking.
  • They take too long to respond.
  • They’re not good communicators.

And too often introverts quietly roll their eyes at their extroverted peers.

  • They talk too much.
  • They speak before they think.
  • They’re not good communicators.

But it doesn’t have to be that way, as these famous pairs show us.

Read the post…

 

 

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

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“The possibilities are numerous once we decide to act and not react.” – George Bernard Shaw

Respond React We want to identify and solve problems instantly, when, in fact, we are not really sure what the problem really is.

Our reaction is to solve problems and to move ahead, rather than creating a process to respond.

Responding is a thinking state while reacting is an emotional state.

Making emotional decisions is the default of an ineffective leader.

Making thoughtful decisions is the decision of an effective leader.

As responsible leaders, we get to choose.

What’s your choice?

 

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

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(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.
Hugh Ballou on August 18th, 2015
Procrastination in the name of reducing risk actually increases risk.” – Colin Powell
Napoleon Hill

Napoleon Hill

I work with many leaders in several countries and in many cultures. There are many things that good leaders have in common. One of the top skills is the ability to make a decision. Decisive leaders create decisive teams.

In past years, I have worked in organizations that utilized the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. We learned enough to be dangerous because we were not able to dedicate enough time to learning effective application of what we had learned about ourselves. Having said this, I was serious about learning more about this instrument and how I function.

My type was ENFJ. The “J” part of this gave me insights on decision making. My type was “Judging.” This meant that once I made a decision, my stress level went down. The other type in this section, is “P” or “Perceiving.” That type was stressed when making a decision. The J got information and made a decision. The P wanted more information. I also learned the liability of each style. The J could make a decision too fast without the necessary information. The P could wait too long in gathering more information and the opportunity could pass without making the decision.

High-functioning teams depend on leaders being able to make effective decisions in a timely manner. Having J and P types working together in making decisions can bring balance to decision making…only if there is a clear line of authority, trusted relationships, and a top leader willing to move to the decision.

When interviewing potential clients, I observe their ability to make decisions. If they can’t make decisions in a timely manner, I know that they are most likely not a good fit to work with me.

When Andrew Carnegie was interviewed by Napoleon Hill, Carnegie made an offer to Hill while holding a stop watch behind the desk. There was a very limited time for Hill to respond. Hill responded promptly with enthusiasm, and Carnegie then was willing to introduce him to the most successful and influential leaders of that era. The results of Hill’s interviews with these great leaders were the basis of his “Laws of Success” and the content for his famous book, Think and Grow Rich. The book, by the way, is really not about money. Money is a result of success and, according to Hill, less valuable than the other 12 attributes of true wealth.

Accepting a leadership role means accepting the role of the decisive leader.

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

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(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.

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Hugh Ballou on July 31st, 2015

Blogs of Note for the Week Ending July 31, 2015

5 blogs that matterEvery day I learn something that advances my leadership knowledge and competency. Here are quotes from 5 blogs that got my attention this week. I don’t benefit from reposting any of these posts. Sometimes, I don’t even know the writer. However, I do read and personally grow my knowledge by reading posts that challenge my thinking and get me to think outside my old paradigm. It’s not important that you agree with any of these writers. It’s only important that you think. I hope you will find some new sources of inspiration with these posts. Here’s the next group of 5 in the series:

 

 

Brian Clark 

The Nasty Four-Letter Word that Keeps You from Writing

Brian ClarkThere’s a nasty demon hiding behind writer’s block. This four-letter word represents a condition we don’t like to admit to ourselves, much less utter in polite conversation.

Yep, it’s the “F word” that’s blocking you from writing.

Fear.

Fear affects us all more than we care to admit, and it’s especially insidious for writers. Writing online is one of those activities where you’re really putting yourself out there, and the critics are always waiting to pounce. But as we’ll see below, failure and mediocrity are not the only things we fear.

Read the post…

 

Denise Restauri 

Top 4 Reasons To Grab A Seat At The Cool Table With Millennials Who Share 

Denise RestauriI can’t find a job. Should I volunteer? Or work for a charity before I enter the real world? Those are the questions I hear from recent college graduates. Their questions make me wonder, “Why are they looking at non-profits as not being a part of working in the real world? And what needs to happen to change this mindset?”

I was meeting with Leila Chambers, the 31-year-old founder of Flying Kites, an organization that is raising the standards of education available to orphaned and critically-poor children in rural Kenya, so I asked her for her take, a few great reasons for college graduates to consider a real career in the non-profit sector.

Read the post…

 

Lyn Boyer 

Stability: How to Show Powerful Leadership Presence

Lyn BoynerPhil was frantic. He was a manager in a mid-sized financial institution, and a recent meeting with his director was very unsettling.

Phil recognized that employees in his department sometimes seemed to ignore his comments, and the quality of their work continued to decline. However, he was not prepared for this meeting in which he learned that unless he turned things around, the CEO would replace him with someone who could.

His leadership ability was in question.

In a meeting with his new executive coach, Phil considered a variety of approaches to his dilemma. He discussed greater penalties for low performance. He thought about increased accountability and oversight of his employees’ work. He wondered which of his employees he should replace with more skilled and willing workers.

Read the post…

 

Jim Dougherty

10 Pro Tips for Instagram

Jim DoughertyInstagram is impressive. It boasts the highest engagement of any social network (4.21 percent engagement per post compared to .07 percent for Facebook), and it is the fastest growing (larger) social network. Images get attention, and Instagram has found the secret formula to effectively present visual content to a social audience.

Despite all the unique features of Instagram, businesses still have questions about what to make of it. Paid options for Instagram don’t (yet) exist for everyone, and the leap of faith for small- to medium-sized businesses to commit resources to a visual social network like Insta without the ad targeting features of Facebook is (as Geans describes) pretty huge.

In this post, I want to share 10 Instagram tips from the experts. These are people who are effectively using Instagram to communicate with and to engage their audience. I didn’t just ask everyone I spoke with to give me tips about Instagram; I asked them to give me their best tips about Instagram. Hopefully their insight will give you some ideas about how you can improve your Instagram presence.

Read the post…

 

Chantal Bechervaise

The 8 Kinds of Leadership Your Team Needs from You

Chantal BechervaiseEvery employee is different, but unfortunately many leaders use a one-size-fits-all approach to leading. In doing so, these otherwise well-intentioned leaders are working harder than they should while not getting all they could out of their teams. How do leaders change the way they approach their employee and teams?

Victor Prince and Mike Figliuolo have the solution in their new book, Lead Inside the Box.  Their new book is already a ‘Top 10 Hot New Release in Leadership on Amazon’. The book starts with the premise that:

1) A leader’s job is to help people move to a position of improved performance and higher satisfaction

2) A leader must lead based on the team member’s needs, not the leader’s own needs

Read the post…

 

 

 

 

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

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(c) 2015 Hugh Ballou. All rights reserved.
Hugh Ballou on July 27th, 2015

Dreams are not the opposite of reality. Dreams inform reality. – Seth Godin*

Opposites copy© Hospitalera | Dreamstime.comYin Yang Photo

Leaders struggle with apparent conflicts and opposite strategies. Transformational Leadership is about transforming thoughts as well as cultures.

Here are some conflicts that challenge me:

  • Perfection versus Moving Ahead
  • Details versus The Big Picture
  • Systems versus Creativity
  • Approval versus Vision
  • Push Leading versus Pull Leading
  • Providing Answers versus Asking Questions
  • Micromanaging versus Coaching

When I was in elementary school, dreaming was discouraged. When I studied piano as a child, I was taught to read the notes and not make things up. In my first job, I was required to follow the rules and to not challenge the system. Things were different then.

Things haven’t changed much in some circles, however. Leaders in charge are limited in their scope by their conditioning, both from their nuclear family and from what they have been taught.

Leadership has been and is continuing to be redefined. The transformation continues with those who are capable, willing, and attentive.

What we have been taught and what we have inherited are not working in today’s world.

The culture we create and lead is a reflection of our skills and vision.

Organizational transformation begins with the leader. There are many pathways to transformation. One channel is defined as Transformational Leadership. It’s a style of leadership defined by Burns and Bass in the 1970s and ’80s. I have added to their data with my musical profile in my Conducting Transformation paradigm.

To have a look at what’s taught, get my free report, “Building the Business of Your Dreams” at http://theleaderaccelerator.com You will receive the report along with a series of videos and questions to help you think about your own transformation. In the series of messages, you will receive an invitation to a personal session with me without cost. You can define what you want to accomplish in that session.

Are you comfortable moving to a place that might not feel comfortable?

Sometimes where we need to move is a place we most resist. My job is to help you feel comfortable if needed, or to challenge your comfort level if that’s what you need and request.

If you are tired of the mundane, let’s chat about it.

* Seth’s blog: http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2015/07/opposition.html

 

Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

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Hugh Ballou on July 24th, 2015

Blogs of Note for the Week Ending July 24, 2015

5 blogs that matterEvery day I learn something that advances my leadership knowledge and competency. Here are quotes from 5 blogs that got my attention this week. I don’t benefit from reposting any of these posts. Sometimes, I don’t even know the writer. However, I do read and personally grow my knowledge by reading posts that challenge my thinking and get me to think outside my old paradigm. It’s not important that you agree with any of these writers. It’s only important that you think. I hope you will find some new sources of inspiration with these posts. Here’s the next group of 5 in the series:

 

 

Crystal Washington

4 Simple Ways to Use Periscope for Business

Crystal WashingtonPeriscope is the popular live video streaming app purchased by Twitter in March 2015. It’s the Instagram of live video streaming, offering users the opportunity to see the world through the eyes of someone else. Users have the capability to share their stories and perspectives to add value to their viewers in the form of entertainment and/or education.

Whether you’re a seasoned business professional or a small business owner, if you use Twitter, and you can add to your credibility and brand using live video as a storytelling tool, you should check out Periscope. You need a Twitter account and the app downloaded to your Android or iOS device to get started.

Read the post…

 

Zach Cutler

5 Strategies I Used to Start and Grow a Successful Business With Only $200

Zach CutlerI graduated from college in the worst year for finding a job in recent history: 2009. I had one interview after another, and the one offer I did receive kept getting delayed. I needed to find a job fast or move back home to California from D.C.

Having always been entrepreneurial, and with a passion for marketing, I decided to form a PR firm with only $200, and a whole lot of unknowns and risks. Six years later, Cutler PR is a leading boutique tech PR firm based in New York that has serviced over 70 clients including the likes of Trivia Crack, Kaltura, Taboola and Gett.

Like many entrepreneurs, I was starting a business with little to no capital…

Read the post…

 

Leonard Kim

Overcome Your Team’s Weaknesses by Focusing on These 3 Things

Leonard KimSabeen Ali is the founder and CEO of AngelHack, a global network of 50,000 programmers. She is a big box thinker and lays out the grand scheme of things.

When you look in the mirror, each of you know what your strengths are. Are you a leader? Visionary? Detail oriented? A great communicator? Strong at analytics?

Whatever it may be, most of you are in tune to who you are.

You may not want to admit it, but when looking in that same mirror, you see what your weaknesses are as well. Are you bad at math? Communicating? Thinking big? Working quickly?

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Neil Patel

What To Do When You’re Completely Out of Blog Ideas

Neil PatelEvery blogger has faced this situation. You’re staring into your computer screen waiting, wondering — what do I write about today?

Content marketing is a massive marketing force. Every day in the life of the internet, two million blog posts are published. According to research from the Content Marketing Institute, marketers have no intent to loosen up their massive content output. Most marketers plan to either maintain or increase the amount of content that they publish.

With all this producing, you might reach a point at which you run out of good ideas. Either you’ve already written it, someone else has already written about it, or you lack the mental energy to come up with something original. What do you do now?

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John Brandon 

Why ‘Flat Management’ Drove 200 Employees Out of Zappos

John BrandonFire that grumpy micro-manager.

Get rid of the boss who is constantly tweaking your task list.

Give that CEO the pink slip when he or she is constantly nitpicking about the sales chart.

That’s the conventional line of thinking for companies like Zappos that have adopted a flat management structure, also known as a holacracy. (You might already know about the term meritocracy, which is equally confusing to people who don’t speak business lingo.)

According to leadership expert and book author Brian Fielkow, companies see management as a bad thing when they respond to micromanagement and think the power is misplaced.

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Hugh Ballou

The Transformational Leadership Strategist TM

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